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Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial cancer is a type of cancer that originates in the uterus. The uterus is hollow, pear-shaped pelvic organ in women where fetal development occurs. More specifically, endometrial cancer starts in the cells that comprise the inner lining of the uterus. Fortunately, endometrial cancer commonly presents at an early stage because it results in abnormal vaginal bleeding, which prompts women to see a doctor. Surgery often removes this cancer. However, other treatments, including clinical trials can be used to treat this form of cancer if surgery fails or is not recommended.

Novel use of Progestin With or Without Sodium Cridanimod Depending on Progesterone Receptor Status for Endometrieal Cancer Clinical Trial

  • For endometrial cancer that is either papillary serous adenocarcinoma or endometrioid in nature
  • Progesterone receptor status must be known to place patient in correct treatment arm
  • If patient is postive for progresterone receptors, then progestin monotherapy will be initiated. If the patient does not have progesterone receptors, the patient will start progestin + sodium cridanimod.
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator: Sara Keck, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Tracy Foster, at 707-521-3836 or Tracy.Foster@stjoe.org

Urothelial Cancer

Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) also urothelial carcinoma (UCC), is a type of cancer that typically occurs in the urinary system. It is the most common type of bladder cancer and cancer of the ureter, urethra, and urachus. Signs and symptoms of transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter include blood in the urine and back pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter or by other conditions. There may be no signs or symptoms in the early stages.Transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis, accounting for only 7% of all kidney tumors, and transitional cell cancer of the ureter, accounting for only 1 of every 25 upper tract tumors, is curable in more than 90% of patients if they are superficial and confined to the renal pelvis or ureter. The major prognostic factor at the time of diagnosis of upper tract transitional cell cancer is the depth of infiltration into or through the uroepithelial wall. Total excision of the ureter with a bladder cuff, renal pelvis, and kidney is recommended in an attempt to provide the greatest likelihood of cure. Also, systemic therapies like the ones below may also prove beneficial.

Novel use of Durvalumab Monotherapy for the Treatment of Urothelial and Non-Urothelial Carcinoma of the Urinary Tract Clinical Trial

  • Study name: STRONG
  • Locally Advanced or Stage IV
  • Progressed on at least one line of chemotherapy < 12 months after the last dose
  • All patients will receive treatment with durvalumab
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator): Ian Anderson, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Tracy Foster, at 707-521-3836 or Tracy.Foster@stjoe.org

Novel use of Nivolumab Combined With Ipilimumab for Previously Treated Unresectable or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Clinical Trial

  • PENDING TO ENROLLMENT
  • Study name: CheckMate901
  • for Stage IV (metastatic) or untreated urothelial cancer
  • For patients who are not eligible for cisplatin chemotherapy
  • Patients will receive either nivolumab + ipilimumab or standard of care chemotherapy in a 1:1 ratio
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator): Ian Anderson, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Tracy Foster, at 707-521-3836 or Tracy.Foster@stjoe.org

Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer starts in the ovaries. Most ovarian tumors are epithelial cell tumors, which are tumors that start from the cells that cover the outer surface of the ovary. Germ cell tumors start from the cells that produce the eggs, and stromal tumors start from structural tissue cells that hold the ovary together and produce the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. Women with ovarian cancer may not have any symptoms, but the most common ones include bloating, pelvic or abdominal pain, trouble eating or feeling full quickly, and urinary urgency or frequency.

Novel PARP Inhibitor for HRD+ Advanced Ovarian Cancer Clinical Trial

  • Study name: PRIMA
  • Stage III-IV and HRD+
  • All patients will receive treatment with niraparib or placebo in a 2:1 ratio
  • Patients need to have had a complete or partial response with ≥ four cycles of front-line platinum-based chemotherapy
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator): Sara Keck, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Tracy Foster, at 707-521-3836 or Tracy.Foster@stjoe.org

Prostate Cancer

Worldwide, prostate cancer ranks second in cancer incidence and sixth in cancer mortality in males. Prostate cancer progresses through a series of characteristic clinical states that represent both the natural history of the disease and response to treatment. Early in the disease, prostate cancers need relatively high levels of androgens to grow. Such prostate cancers are referred to as androgen dependent or hormone sensitive; therefore, treatments that decrease androgen levels or block androgen activity can inhibit their growth.

Novel Combination of ADT & an Antiandrogen (Xtandi) for Hormone Sensitive Metastatic Prostate Cancer Clinical Trial

  • Study name: ARCHES
  • Stage IV (metastatic)
  • Patients will receive androgen deprivation therapy plus Xtandi/placebo in a 1:1 ratio
  • Patients who have metastatic disease and are sensitive to testosterone deprivation may be eligible
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator): Ian Anderson, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Teresa Lund, at 707-521-3803 or Teresa.Lund@stjoe.org

A Study of Rucaparib for Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Associated with HRD

  • Study name: TRITON 2
  • Stage IV (metastatic)
  • Patients will receive Rucabarib
  • Patients who have metastatic disease and progressed on AR-targeted therapy & taxane-based chemotherapy may be eligible
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator): Thomas Stanton, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Teresa Lund, at 707-521-3803 or Teresa.Lund@stjoe.org

A Study of Rucaparib vs AR-Directed Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Associated with HRD

  • Study name: TRITON 3
  • Stage IV (metastatic)
  • Patients will be randomized to receive either Rucabarib OR AR-therapy (Abiraterone or Enzalutamide OR Docetaxel)
  • Patients who have metastatic disease progressed on AR-targeted therapy, and not received chemotherapy in castration-resistant therapy may be eligible
  • Main study doctor (principal investigator): Thomas Stanton, MD
  • For more information, please contact the lead coordinator, Teresa Lund, at 707-521-3803 or Teresa.Lund@stjoe.org

Please contact the Clinical Trials & Research department for more information by calling 707-521-3830.

To read about targeted therapy for patients with solid tumors, including patients with ovarian cancer and other types of genitourinary cancer, please click HERE.